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Basics of Sensation Vision More Vision Hearing Other Senses
100
What is perception?
The process of making our sensations meaningful.
100
What are light waves?
The stimulus energy of vision.
100
What is the wave height (amplitude)?
This determines how bright a color appears.
100
What is the wavelength?
Determines the pitch of a sound.
100
What is the gate-control theory?
The dominant theory of pain that believes pain signals are either blocked or allowed to pass.
200
What is transduction?
The transformation of a stimulus energy (such as light waves) into a neural impulse.
200
What is the wavelength?
This determines the color of a something.
200
What is the Young-Helmholtz trichromatic theory?
The theory of color that relies on our red, green, and blue receptors.
200
What is the ear drum?
Part of the ear that sound waves initially come in contact with that sends a chain reaction amplifying them.
200
What is the vestibular sense?
Our inner ear gives us this sense of balance.
300
What is top-down processing?
Using previous experience and expectations to process sensory information.
300
What is the iris?
The muscle that controls how much light passes through the pupil.
300
What is shape constancy?
The reason we still perceive a door as a rectangle even if the actual image you see is not a rectangle (i.e., open door).
300
What is the cochlea?
Part of the ear that contains hair cells, which receive sound waves.
300
What is umami?
Receptor that detects proteins in food.
400
What is an absolute threshold?
The point at which you hear a sound 50% of the time.
400
What are cones?
The fovea contains more of these light receptors which allow us to see color.
400
What are feature detectors?
Neurons in our visual cortex that allow us to perceive lines, shapes, movement, etc.
400
What is sensorineural hearing loss?
The most common type of deafness caused by damage to the hair cells or nerve cells.
400
What is the sense of smell?
The only sense that is not relayed through the thalamus before being perceived.
500
What are context effects?
When the situation affects your perception.
500
What are monocular cues?
Depth cues that do not rely on having 2 eyes (e.g., interposition, linear perspective).
500
What is retinal disparity?
The ability to see 3D close-up because of this binocular cue.
500
What is place theory?
Theory that links sound heard to the location on the cochlea that it stimulates.
500
What is embodied cognition?
When our sensations and emotions affect our perception.




PSY 101 Chapter 6

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